Reading Minds in Martial Arts

Newsletter 804
Matrixing the Thought of Combat

Man!
It is BEEYOUTIFUL out.
Time for a BEEYOUTIFUL workout!

A quick word:
Google is suppressing newsletter,
but you can find this newsletter blogged at
alcase.wordpress.com.

Bruce Lee did a good job of analyzing the motion of combat.
He took apart when,
for instance,
during the opponent’s punch,
you should attack.
You can find out more about this if you dig around at
FreeBruceLee.com.

BUT,
nobody’s ever really tried to figure out
what happens at the moment of combat.
Not the moment of launch,
but the thought that must occur
before the launch.

And,
to be honest,
nobody’s ever had the neutronics data,
so it is no wonder that nobody has ever done this.

SO…

the one thing to remember is that you have a thought,
and energy, and body,
follow it.
The odd thing in all this
is that thoughts go in only two directions.

Thoughts go out.
Thoughts go in.

This can be made complex,
if you stick on analyzing emotion,
emotion disguises what you are doing,
and so on.

So,
the exact moment of attack,
should be when the opponent is,
for whatever reason,
not thinking out,
towards you,
but inwards,
towards himself.

If you understand this,
you understand the purpose of meditation:
sitting (or moving) and never allowing thoughts to invert,
to come back towards yourself.
In other words,
to watch the world
without having internal thoughts.

Here are the ways you can take advantage
of this momentary lapse of awareness.
The most important is distraction.

Distraction is when you point the opponent’s attention elsewhere.

He blinks because of a fly.
He looks because of a motion to the side.
He thinks when you tell him there is someone behind him.
He thinks because you trash talk.
He gets mad,
or otherwise falls to emotion.
And so on.

You can attack when any of these,
or other,
distractions occur.

You can attack after the thought of attack,
but that is not a good idea,
unless you are immaculate in your strategy and tactics.
The reason is attacks will collide,
mistakes can be made once you let him go into motion,
and so on.

BUT…
the best time to attack a person?
Before he has the thought.

Doesn’t matter when he makes a decision,
or for what reason,
you simply attack before his thought.
At that point he has become victim,
as he is going to be responding to your attack,
instead of creating an original one of his own.

Here’s the thing,
people think you can’t see a thought.
But you can.
It takes an immense amount of discipline in classical martial arts.
It takes less time in matrixed martial arts.
Logic just allows you to study,
and therefore learn,
faster.

Heck,
you see people thinking all the time.
You see the look in their eyes,
you read their bodies,
you feel their energy.
If you are good you actually perceive the thought.
But that level of good
depends upon how effective and sincere your training has been.

The lesson here?
Train hard,
train long,
matrix (make logical)
everything you do.
Make yourself a perceptive person
by looking out at the world,
and not inward to your own thoughts,
troubles,
emotions,
etc.

Here’s my personal martial art…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

I created it after doing most of the matrixing courses,
it was my own understanding codified.
It should help you read thoughts faster.

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

And don’t forget to sign up for the newsletter at

https://alcase.wordpress.com

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

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