Two Crooks Tripped Up by Little Girl’s Dream

Newsletter 941
Catching the Crooks

When my grandmother was a little girl
the family was very religious,
went to church every Sunday.

One Sunday her younger sister was sick.
The family decided that just this once
she could stay home.
Sniffling and snuffling,
the young girl went to her room
at the end of the second floor hall
and went to sleep.

Shortly after the rest of the family went to church,
a car pulled up in front of the house.
Two rough looking fellows got out,
looked around,
and hurried up the walk.

In the house they quickly checked for occupants.
One fo the crooks ascended the stairs
and walked down the hallway,
looking in every room.
He stopped right before he reached the young girl’s room.
Heck, there wasn’t anybody home.
He turned around and helped his friend ransack the hosue.

They took jewelry,
silverware,
anything that wasn’t nailed down.
They put the swag in several pillow cases
they had taken out of a closet.
They walked down the front walk
got in their car and drove away.

An hour later the family returned home.
Shocked,
they went through the house,
the mother broke down in tears
and the father called the cops.

The cops came and looked for clues,
and talked to everybody.
But everybody had been at church,
nobody had seen anything.

‘I suppose it’s a good thing nobody was home,’
said the officer.
‘But somebody was home!
Our little girl is sick,
she’s sleeping upstairs.’

The cops asked to speak to the young girl.
The young girl was feeling better,
but she still sniffed and snuffled
when she walked into the room.
And she wasn’t surprised to find out
the house had been burglarized.

‘Oh, yeah,’
she said.
‘I saw them.’

‘But you were sleeping!’
protested her mother.

‘I know,
but I saw them in my dreams.
I watched them take everything.’

One of the cops snorted.
The older one,
the chief,
merely said,
‘Tell me what you saw.’

So my grandmother’s younger sister
told of the crooks driving up,
how they looked around,
how they checked the house for people,
but stopped before they reached her room.
She then described,
step by step,
how the crooks went through the house,
what they took,
how they carried it out the front door.

At the end she said,
‘When they reached their car
one of the men turned around,
saw me looking out of my window,
and he waved to me.
Then he got in the car and they drove away.

The family figured the girl had been hallucinating,
had made up a dream to match what had happened.
The younger cop thought it was a crock.
The older cop asked her to describe the two men.
She did,
and the old cop said,
‘That’s those two boys living on the outskirts of town.’

The cops went off,
broke down the door of the shack the two men were living in
and arrested them.
All of the stolen goods were recovered,
except for a few pieces of silverware
that had already been melted down.

The two crooks confessed,
and their descriptions of their crime
matched everything the younger sister had said,
except for the waving of the hand at the end.
One of the crooks said,
‘I would wave at nobody I had just stole from!’

Now,
this story is absolutely true.
It happened to my grandmother,
who relayed it to my brother and sister and I.
A bit of the Case family lore.

So why do I tell you now?
Because there is something very important you should understand
if you are ever going to learn the truth of matrixing,
and the truth of the martial arts.

There is a sixth sense,
and there are abilities in your dreams,
and they exist,
but they only exist for you
if you believe that they can exist.
Don’t believe and you never get those abilities,
believe and you will find them.

I was raised in a family where we believed in such things,
in the power of imagination and hard work,
where people could have special abilities
if they worked hard enough.

Many of you out there know what I say,
you probably have your own family legends,
your own experiences in imagination and abilities.
But for those of you who are weak in such things,
read this story again,
and realize that this is the stuff of martial arts.

You can learn them fast,
you can have intuition,
you can be superior.
Really,
there is nothing that you can’t do.

You just have to believe.

Have a great work out!
Al

Tai Chi is great for developing intuition and abilities,
here’s the link, and below it a great win!

2ba Matrix Tai Chi Chuan

A WIN!

Al,
Great news! I have been working with the Matrix Tai Chi basics performing each one dozens of times and holding the finished posture for three breaths each. This has made my Five Army form so much better! My power has increased in my karate forms as well. Just need to work on Shaolin Butterfly to get the basics down for the Bagua stuff. Well hope you’re having a great 2016 so far.
Justin

Translating Karate into MMA

Newsletter 940

Finding MMA Jointlocks in Karate

I teach at a school near my house.
The school is predominately MMA,
and I teach things like Karate, Kung Fu, Monkey boxing.
So how do I get away with it?
Let me tell you…

One day I was helping one of the mma instructors.
He’s showing takedowns and locks and such,
and then,
because he knows I have limited MMA,
he glances in my direction,
makes sure I am helping him in the right way.
I’m working with one of the students,
no problem,
Except there was a problem.
I had done the takedown,
but couldn’t figure out how to get to the lock.
The instructor is about to come over,
and suddenly I roll up the student’s body.
Just roll,
like sideways,
using my weight.
The student under me tries to push me back,
I alter a bit,
and zingo bingo,
I have myself a kimura.
The student under me slaps the mat.
The instructor says,
how did you do that?

huh,
isn’t that the best question in the world?
How did I do that?
We weren’t working on kimuras,
he hadn’t shown anybody kimuras,
and he mentioned that he had never seen anybody
apply a kimura like that.
You see,
in MMA,
which is heavy on Brazilian Jujitsu,
there are certain sequences you use
to get a kimura,
but I hadn’t used one of those sequences.
I had done something he had never seen before.

The way I did it was straight out of karate.
When somebody punches
you execute a downward crossed wrist block.
Then you push the wrist one way,
manipulate the elbow by placing a finger behind the elbow,
and snake into a kimura.
When the student had tried to push me back
I had treated it like a punch.

The other instructor thought my technique was great fun,
he practiced,
showed it to other instructors,
and,
of course,
he showed me the technique I should have done.
But here’s the thing:
we (karate, kung fu, whatever) have all the locks and throws
that are in MMA,
we just do them standing up.
They do them lying down,
Same lock.
But because mma usually does a takedown first
they sometimes don’t understand the version
where you lock while standing up.

Now I’m not making a statement,
I respect all arts,
there are blank spots in every art,
and that’s what makes it so much fun
to train with people from other arts.


The above link is an unlisted one,
it shows the lock I used.
Now it is a downward kimura,
not an upward one,
not an official ‘chicken wing,’
as it is sometimes called.
And,
to tell the truth,
I have no idea what the name is in other languages or arts.
Downward kimura?
upside down elbow lock?
Anyway,
it is part of the upcoming Monkey Boxing epic I am working on.
For the last couple of years I have been working on
a website,
a series of videos,
presenting Al Case Monkey Boxing.
Which is the world’s first complete and perfect
BRAND NEW martial art.
Sure,
you can make karate perfect,
or kung fu or whatever,
but this art,
ACMB,
is new from the ground up,
and I thought you might enjoy a taste of what is coming.

So far I’ve got over 200 videos presenting this art,
it will be the best video course
in the history of the martial arts.
VERY comprehensive.
And,
interestingly enough,
I’ve got 7 guys I have been showing it to.
They signed up for the MB vid course
a little over a year ago,
so the whole thing will be proofed by them
by the time it is released.

Anyway,
I thought I would show you one of the videos.
You can see that I am not interested in beating people up,
but rather teaching them.
Mechanically, scientifically, philosophically.
Enjoy,
and remember what I said earlier,
stand up arts have all the MMA locks and such,
but only if the instructor understands the difference
between standing up and laying down.

Have a great work out!

Al

This course is the original,
it will stay the same when I present
the whole Monkey Boxing art…

1b Matrix Kung Fu

A WIN WITH MONKEY BOXING IN IT!

I wanted to share this with you: this last Saturday I was in my Brazilian Jiujitsu class and it dawned on me. Many of the  submissions are similar to techniques from other arts. An arm lock in Jiujitsu is a block in Muay Thai, and a movement from Monkey Boxing is a lockdown (or pin) in Jiujitsu. Doing the Matrixing courses has begun to bring things together in a way I hadn’t ever noticed before. But it isn’t in a confusing way. It just fits.

Thanks,
Mylan B

Stumbling on the Path of the True Martial Art

Newsletter 939

Translating Karate into Everything

Hey Guys and Gals!
I just wrote the following newsletter,
and I just wanted to say thanks to you guys,
for being martial artists,
and making my path so worthwhile.
Hope you enjoy…

I was a black belt in Karate when I started Aikido.
I always remember the shock on the Aikido black belt’s faces,
I had a question
and I would walk right up
and ask the question.
If you’ve ever been around the classical,
that’s not how you do stuff.
You bow and scrape.
You practice speaking in a subdued manner.
You treat yourself like a humble dope
so they will take pity on you.
But I was a black belt in karate,
I was equal,
be it in another system,
so I would walk up and break the etiquette,
I would just ask.
Funny thing,
they always answered my questions.
I suppose they couldn’t figure out how to say no,
without themselves looking like a doofus.
So one day I’m asking a question,
and this black belt blinks,
and realizes.
‘You’re a black belt.’
Yup.
Then he took me aside,
we traded stuff madly,
really got into the art.
But here’s the interesting thing:
in Karate,
when you get to black belt,
you start figuring out how to use specific forms in freestyle.
Sure.
You’re intuitive,
you start reading minds,
guy thinks about an attack,
you think about a defense from a form,
and they match.
Not like today when people just fight.
Now,
at black belt I wasn’t interested in that.
Did it,
but wasn’t interested.
I was already reading everything,
looking at other arts,
and I wanted to make other arts work.
Of course,
the big problem was that I hadn’t really studied other arts.
I had read about them.
Big problem.
So doing the Aikido class,
I began to realize that I was performing the same body motions,
but going with the opponent
instead of against.
Instead of colliding with an inward block,
if I did a quick step and made the in block go with the attack,
I had aikido.
Zingo Bingo!
Then I looked at Tai Chi,
figured out the concepts,
applied them to Karate motions,
and I was doing Tai Chi.
And,
yes,
it was that simple.
Everything translated if you understood the concept behind the art.
Went through a few Kung Fu systems.
Did weapons,
and so on.
Matrixing was born,
and I wrote a million words
to describe everything
so everybody could understand it.
Do you study one system?
Silly you.
With a few tweaks you could be studying all the martial arts.
Now,
there are a few things to look out for.

First,
most systems these days
have become so muddied
they don’t have specific concepts.

Second,
most systems don’t have the right blend of forms and freestyle,
they end up with two arts…
the art of whatever their forms are
and the art of freestyle.

Third
most systems don’t stick to the path long enough
to become intuitive.
They end up putting boxing into their training,
mixing in MMA so they can advertise,
and so on.
You can recognize these systems
because people describe by using such terms as /muscle memory.’
Muscle memory is what you have until you go intuitive,
then it’s a whole new ballgame.
Then you are in the now.
And that’s a very zen thing.

The thing is,
when you have a system that works,
you can’t go hunting and pecking through other systems,
you have to do your whole system,
then you have to understand the concepts of the other system,
and you have to understand how these concepts work by physics and mechanics.
Then you have to work your butt off.

When I was figuring this stuff out
I was working out several hours a day,
even if I had no partner.
I would do air forms,
pound the bag,
work with weapons,
and write everything I did down.
And,
therein lies the difference
between a martial artist,
and a fellow who practices the martial arts.
We all start out the same,
going to classes,
blindly groping.
The fellow who practices martial arts,
however,
stops.
The martial artist doesn’t stop.
He becomes more and more obsessive,
finding new things to obsess about,
compelled to learn new things,
always dissatisfied with his progress,
always knowing that the truth is right around the corner,
if he could just see…a…little…further.
Anyway,
that’s the path from Karate to Aikido to everything else.
It’s not an easy path,
if you measure it in bruises and hours,
but it is the easiest path if you are obsessed.
Here’s to you,
I hope you’re obsessed.

Have a great work out!

Al

1c Matrix Aikido

AN AIKIDO WIN!

Here’s a fellow who illustrates what I’ve been saying…

Hi,
Just wanted to take the time to thank you.  Having now watched and read through the Matrix Karate system it is exactly what I was hoping it would be when I originally made the purchase.  I have begun working my way through the material and am enjoying every second of it!  I have since also bought (I’ve been treating myself each pay day) your monkey boxing and within the last few days your Aikido course.  Both I have found instantly applicable, and although I have only watched the Aikido seminar once so far, I have quickly identified that together they are so much more than the sum of their parts!   Within just a few days of the monkey boxing course arriving, I found that I was suddenly able to lock and manipulate to restrain far higher grades than myself in the club I attend, and now have found I have members of all levels, and even my own instructor asking me to just go over techniques so they can see what I did.  Suffice to say that the guy (every club has one) that is like an immovable object was lying face down the very first time I tried a technique you had discussed… and I see no reason why my skills won’t take on a similar bound forward as I absorb the Aikido course.  
I am sure you hear such stories all the time from people like me (over enthused with what must seem mundane to yourself) but I really felt I ought to say thank you.  One thing I am not sure if other people have found, but I want to mention, I truly appreciate you laying ‘it all’ out for people, by which I mean I appreciate the reward  (in terms of knowledge) coming from hard work and ‘flight time’ rather than an arbitrary period between Dan Gradings no matter how often one trains in that time before the next chunk of knowledge is passed on.  I will continue to follow your courses and let each build on what went before.
One more thanks for the recommendation to read ‘As a man Thinketh’ I really took a lot from it.
Anyhow, I’ll leave you be, and stop pestering you with my ramblings.
Many thanks one last time,
Adam D.

Martial Arts Rules for the Ages!

Newsletter 938

Martial Arts Rules to Live By

We are born and we don’t know the rules.
the result is that for the history of man
we have been making up rules

Over 4,000 years ago
Hammurabi set down his rules.
280 rules on 12 stone tablets.
These rules dealt with everything,
from contracts to murder.

Then there was Moses,
10 rules on two tablets.

And throughout history everybody has made up rules,
rules to trade,
rules for criminals and punishment,
rules for marriage.

In your martial art there are doubtless rules.
Funakoshi wrote that there were six rules.
then only gave us five.
My theory is that the missing third rule had to do with matrixing.
But maybe that’s just me.
Grin.

In the school I am currently teaching
we have rules.
The head sensei came across these rules somewhere,
and printed them up and posted them
on the front door of the school.
Just to let you know,
before I reveal the rules,
his school specializes in kids.
He has no problem with specialized needs.
We even have a girl who is blind.
Every kid in there gets to help her,
and they all love it.
And she is actually learning some good martial arts.
Anyway,
here are the rules he posted.

In this studio…
We do second chances
We apologize
We forgive
We respect each other
We keep our promises
We never give up
We encourage one another
We laugh often
We belong…

I find it interesting to compare these rules
with the rules of other schools,
with rules posted by Funakoshi,
Hammurabi,
or whoever.

Obviously,
these rules were crafted by somebody
who wanted to reassure parents,
maybe was a social justice warrior,
maybe not,
and that’s okay.

My rules are pretty simple,
I write about them occasionally,
especially in my books on Neutronics.
They include such things as…

‘Be polite.’

and…

‘For something to be true,
the opposite must also be true.’

There are lots of rules in the world,
but they usually come back to such things as these.
I believe in simplicity.
Life is simple,
there is right…or wrong.
A simple choice,
that doesn’t need a lot of explanation.

The thing is this…
if you want to know the rules,
work out harder.
The rules of life are self-evident.
Simple truths.
Only crooks make them difficult.

Anyway,
I recommend ‘Chiang Nan’ this week.

Chiang Nan

This book holds my thoughts on the original karate form,
how to translate karate to Tai Chi,
and the techniques deliberately hidden by the old masters.

The reason is simple…
if the old masters really hid the real techniques,
they were likely breaking their own rules.
Either that,
or they hadn’t worked out hard enough
to understand the real rules of living
and of the martial arts.

Have a great work out!

Al

Chiang Nan

WIN!

Here’s a couple of wins I received. What makes them interesting is that two different people came across my ‘Buddha Crane’ book, and they reached similar conclusions, and had a heck of a lot of fun doing it.
The Buddha Crane book is bundled into ‘how to create your own art,’ and also as a book on Amazon.

Hello sir.
It’s going well. Really well. Once I was able to connect Buddha crane with shuri ryu, the pieces began to fall into place all by themselves.
The Buddha crane is the foundation of the kihon waza, ippons waza and came into their own flow drills(taezus naru waza).
Making changes to the Kata isn’t as easy, but I have done the first few Kata. Even crazier, I found someone who has already blended shuri ryu with something. So, it came rather easy.
Upon showing him how I’ve made changes opened his eyes and he’s asking me to give him pointers on how to make his karate be more ‘alive’.
My shuri ryu master is dead and I never got the chance to get my black belt. So, I’ve gone thru these people I’ve run into and just from what I showed them they are willing to bring me to the black belt in shuri ryu.
I’m not sure if that’s even important now, being that I matrixed the whole art, but I do hope to bring this understanding of shuri ryu to the table. Thus, starting a new (sub) ryu to the family.
I couldn’t have done it without you. Osu ~ Timothy G

Master founder,
How are you doing. I hope all is well. Happy belated fourth. Been busy with creating the art to make it my own. Honestly, I’ve been  working on some things with the arts. Oh yeah, I found a way to matrix the shuri ryu style. Quite interesting to see an existing art turn into something really workable.
Thanks to you sir, I’ve gained an understanding of true art. What turned it to be a great help was Buddha Crane Karate. Some fine points in that book. ~ John L

A Real Sword fight (sorta) with Real Blood

Newsletter 937

Using a Sword for Real!

There was one time I used a sword for real.
Sort of.
At any rate,
I used swordsmanship to cut open an attacker’s chest.
Lot of blood on that one.

I was working in a door factory,
big, noisy warehouse,
and a couple of the fellows there knew I knew martial arts.
One of them asked me,
quite seriously and with respect,
how to use a sword.
We went into the back of the warehouse,
one of the badly lit areas,
and picked up a couple of metal runners for sliding doors.
They were about the length of swords,
no edge,
but a nasty and poorly cut end.
So I showed him how to hold it,
showed him a couple of cuts,
and suddenly I felt a huge hand,
much bigger than my body,
grab my body
and pull my sword back.
For some reason,
I didn’t know why,
I pushed the sword sideways.
It went sideways slightly,
then back down,
and then cut through the chest
of a fellow sneaking up behind me.
Poor Eddie.
Blood all over the place,
didn’t know what had hit him.
Figured it was an accident,
and life went on.

But I was profoundly effected by the incident.
I asked Eddie,
after we had him all patched up,
what he had been doing.
‘I was sneaking up on you.
I was going to grab you.’
And I knew what he was thinking,
‘I’ll show him this karate crap doesn’t work!’
So I asked him what he was thinking.
He said, ‘Right before you cut me,
I thought…
‘Gotcha!’
Then I cut him.

Gotcha.
There was the thought that made me move.
It was strong enough to wake up the art,
and the art doesn’t mess around.
If I hadn’t pushed,
with all my might,
that sword would have cut right through his face.
Marked him up for life.
But somehow I managed to resist that energy
that had grabbed me
and was moving me.

Some people don’t believe in this stuff.
Don’t believe in ‘chi,’
think superhuman stunts are BS,
nothing more than vivid imaginations.

But I had experienced it.
I felt like a little puppet
in the hand of the true art.

So what was it?
What was this energy that moved me?
Chi?
Some mystical Kung Fu god come to help me out?
Maybe just a bigger version of me?
The ‘me-spirit’ that operates this body called Al?
None of the above?
All of the above?
I know…but there’s no way I can describe it,
other than through the incident itself.
It’s something that happens subjectively,
can’t be proven in real universe terms,
can’t be proven by physics.
But,
really,
it doesn’t matter.
I just know,
in solid terms proven by experience,
that the martial arts enabled me to create this experience.
The martial arts protected me.
And if you study the martial arts. intensely enough,
you’ll experience it, too.

So why don’t others experience this kind of thing?
I think lots of people do,
but since there’s no way to explain,
they don’t want to sound like a kook,
so they don’t say anything.

But I get letters from a LOT of people,
and a LOT of people tell me things that happened to them,
that are similar,
in some way,
to my experience.

So why don’t more people experience this kind of thing?
Because they stop too soon.
The martial arts tend to be a long path.
If I hadn’t stuck to it,
obsessed on it with this matrixing thing,
I might not have experienced it.
And here’s something I do know…
Matrixing will speed up your progress.
It will speed up your evolution as a martial artist.
And maybe that is the key,
to get to a certain point,
to live enough life
to where you get to that signpost of ability,
that experience of something greater
than the so-called ‘science’ of mankind.
I certainly hope so.
I don’t want people to go fast enough
so they get ‘done’ with the Martial Arts…
I want them to go fast enough to reach the real martial arts,
that area where mystical things happen,
where abilities pop out,
where the true art protects you no matter what,
and in the firmest of terms.

Hey,
obligatory,
got to give you a link.
You know where to find matrixing,
the Monster,
and here’s the Matrix Kenjutsu link,
which is what I was showing the fellow
when the big hand turned the heck out of me.

Matrixing Kenjutsu

Have a great work out!

Al

Matrixing Kenjutsu

Mr. Case,
I have received the Master Instructor Course, read it multiple times and have wondered…where has this information been and why is this not required for all instructors that have the care of their students entrusted in them? I was amazed that the principles of Matrixing and how they can take any martial art and develop it into one practicum.
The most obvious observations I made is that my students seem to “lose” their breath while training. By demonstrating the breathing techniques that you share in the course, I was able to assist in redirecting their breathing patterns.
I look forward to introducing more of your principles into the classes. I have ordered the “Matrix Karate” course and anticipate a great learning and training experience, with it.
Thank you, Mr. Case
GARREN

 

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FREE

The Truth About Martial Arts Work Outs!

Newsletter 935

Why Do a Martial Arts Work Out?

Good and HOT day to you!
It’s over a 100 here in so cal,
And PERFECT for working out!

Hey,
Can I get in your face for a moment?
How much do you work out?
The whole purpose of this newsletter
is to encourage the work out.
So how much do you work out?

To me,
A work out is like a prayer.
I work out EVERY day.
Rain or shine,
Hot or cold,
In good health or poor.
Heck,
Because of working out I’m 70,
and feel like a 25 year old.
I think that makes it all pretty important.

When I work out I get in touch with me.
My thoughts are clearer all day,
Bushwah that bugs me
Suddenly recedes,
Becomes unimportant.
Problems become easy.
People who are difficult suddenly become…easy.
So how much do you work out?

Let me tell you something…
When I was working for my black belt
All those years ago,
I didn’t work out as much as I should.
I just worked out at the school,
Thought that was the only place to work out.
Boy,
Was I dumb.
Then,
Over the years,
I became aware of how much martial arts was doing for me.
I began obsessing.
Reading everything,
Studying everything,
Working out until the wee hours.
But,
You know,
I always have this little niggle inside.
I had wasted time.
I had not worked out obsessively back in the beginning.
I had only worked out at the school.
What wasted opportunities.
When I was fresh and full of vim and vigor,
I relaxed.
I wasted.
What a dope.

So that’s the message of this newsletter,
Now and always…

WORK OUT!
Agree with me or not,
Disagree or not,
The fact is that this is a reminder.
Nothing more,
Nothing less.

Here’s a recent win to encourage you.

Al,

I have gone through many of your courses and am currently going through blinding steel and eventually on my way to forty monkeys. I recently went through your book Matrixing Tong Bei. Several things clicked and the martial arts universe opened up after finishing that book.
Respectfully,
Tyler K

Come on,
Guys and gals,
Work out and make the universe open up for you!

Have a great work out!

Al

Here;S the Blinding Steel course, in it you learn how to matrix ALL weapons!

4a Blinding Steel (Matrixing Weapons)

Martial arts Injuries are Stupid…Here’s How You Deal With Them

Newsletter 934

Martial Arts Injuries!

I don’t usually get injured,
And when I do it’s usually something stupid.
I detached a tendon in the fourth finger of my right hand.
Stupid.
And it takes six weeks to grow back.
But,
Every tragedy is an opportunity,
So let me elucidate on that.

First,
When you are injured
You figure out better ways to do things,
You are forced out of the same old same old,
And start to think,
How can I do this technique?
Should I change angles?
Use the other hand in a different way?
And so on.
And,
There is a bump in awareness.
You have to move so that you don’t impact,
But rather match the trajectory
Of whatever is incoming.
So you learn stuff,
And get smarter.
But stupid injuries are still just that…
stupid.

And,
At this point,
Let me offer the injury formula,
If not for your benefit,
Then mine.

Speed plus Ignorance equals Injury.
S + Ig = In

Geez.
You’d think I would have that down,
eh?

Except that it is a caution to go slow enough
to engage your ability to analyze,
And not a guarantee.

Anyway,
That all said,
Let me point out that
‘Chiang Nan’
Is the book that teaches you
how to make karate into Tai Chi.
I’ll be doing a lot of Chiang Nan
For the next six weeks,
And I urge you to look into it.

Chiang Nan


It has a TREMENDOUS amount of knowledge,
And a whole new way of looking at the martial arts.

And,
One other reason I am pushing this book,
I am about to come out with a new one.
So get caught up,
Don’t get left behind.
I’ll let you know about it,
Probably the next newsletter.

Okely Doggone Dokely,
I wave my busted finger at you,
And caution you…
WORK OUT HARD
You never when you’re going to get busted.
(insert a trickle of a tear down my cheek here)

Al

Chiang Nan

The Right Way to Teach Martial Arts

Newsletter 933

A Different Method for Teaching Martial Arts

One thing I noticed,
Over the years,
Is that people like to make things harder.
In the beginning,
Mac was easy,
intuitive.
Tried a Mac lately?

Or,
How about a car?
Used to be you could take your car apart,
Fix any little problem,
And even the big problems.

You know how we used to work on Volkswagons? (Beetles)
We would drive the car over a couple of four by fours,
Let the air out of the tires,
Loosen four bolts,
And lift the car off the engine.
Try that with your new Lexus!

And,
The sad thing,
The same thing has happened to the martial arts.
They have become so difficult.
Memorize a couple of dozen routines,
Make a couple of hundred techniques work,
And so on.

But…
Here’s something interesting,
You hear it all the time,
But it’s still interesting…
You never use forms in combat.

And,
I should correct that…
You never use forms in combat…in modern times.
Back in the sixties and seventies we did.
Used the heck out of the forms.
Taught us incredible things.

So what happened?

People started making the forms difficult.
Instead of letting people just do the forms,
Until the forms taught the people,
Teachers started getting nit picky,
Explaining things that didn’t need explaining.
Foisting BS concepts.
Mixing pieces of different arts together,
Without understanding what either art was.
And so on.

Got real difficult,
You know?

But the mind doesn’t like difficult.
And,
Let’s face it,
A fight isn’t difficult.
You either trained in your basics,
And those basics are intuitive,
Or you didn’t,
And they aren’t.

In matrixing you make things logical,
And this makes things simple.

You don’t have to memorize techniques
you would never use in combat.
We use an entirely different method
For learning techniques
That WILL work in combat.
Here is how I teach.

Let’s say I give a person the matrix of blocks.
This is a handful of blocks that,
Through a simple trick of logic,
Becomes over 60 techniques.
The student starts working his way
Through the circle of blocks.
He reaches one which doesn’t work.
He comes over to me and says,
‘Al, this doesn’t work.’
I say,
‘Oh, you can’t make it work.’
They say,
‘No, it actually doesn’t work.’
So I say,
‘try changing which foot is forward.’
It doesn’t work.
‘Try changing the timing.’
It doesn’t work.
‘Try changing…’
It doesn’t work.
And so on.
Finally,
They throw up their hands.
They say,
‘I told you…it doesn’t work!’
I say,
‘Oh,
Why didn’t you say so!’
They blink,
Their eyes open,
Sometimes we get a little frustration popping out.
I say,
‘So,
Did you learn anything?’
And…they did.
They usually say ‘yes.’
If they say no,
I ask them,
‘Well, would you use it in a fight?’
‘No.’
‘Then I guess you learned something.’

Now,
You may think I’m being ridiculous,
But the Martial Arts are full of techniques
That people try to make work,
And they don’t work.
Yet people train and train,
Never actually coming to grips
With the fact that the technique doesn’t work.

Let me light this method of teaching up.

You get frustrated by your ‘smart’ phone.
You curse the thing for being dumb.
We’ve all been there.
But a child picks that phone up and programs it for you.
ARGH!
Makes it even worse, doesn’t it?

Now put that child in the cockpit of a stealth fighter.
You know what’s going to happen, don’t you?
Grin.
And that brat,
Making a super techno gimmick like that work,
Is all the more frustrating.
Repeat…
ARGH!

But the child has not been taught that doing something wrong is…wrong.
So he just makes his mistake,
corrects,
Never inputs society calling him stupid,
And flies the plane.

I don’t have to train him,
By using methods like the one I described earlier,
To accept his mistakes.
He’s already quite happy making mistakes!
And he is willing to learn from them.
Doesn’t have all that ‘grown up’ distraction stuff.
Heh.

So,
Let’s bring it home.
The martial arts are every bit as complicated
As flying a super stealth fighter jet.
The proof is that so few do it right.
They end up fighting,
And not handling the incoming missiles,
And downing the attacker,
In a simple, scientific manner.

Unless,
Of course,
They have embedded themselves with
A heaping helping of…
matrixing.

Guaranteed,
You have been infected by grown up things like…
‘YOU’RE DOING IT WRONG!’
How many times have you heard an instructor say,
‘No, no. Do it like this.’
‘No, no. Use your arm like this.’
No, no. Don’t kick in a situation like this!’
About a million times.
Even the best meaning instructor
infers,
implies,
Tells the student he is wrong.
And the student,
Having been educated in school,
Knows that he is wrong,
And somebody else is right.
His parents have told him he is wrong.
His teachers have told him that he is wrong.
Even his friends have told him that he is wrong.

You know how I teach?
Let’s say I see somebody eating a kick.
Trying the same wrong block over and over.
I don’t tell him why he is wrong.
I never tell a student he is wrong.
I simply say,
‘Move to the left.’
The student doesn’t.
I repeat,
‘Move to the left.’
The student doesn’t.
And,
After a few dozen times,
He finally moves to the left.
Kick slides by.
‘What are you going to do?’
Student looks blank.
‘Do it again.’
The kick slides by.
And,
eventually,
The student blinks,
Hooks the kick,
And body bumps the hip.
Opponent goes flying.
I never told the student what to do…
I never made him wrong,
Or tried to tell him what I would do.
I just gave a simple direction.
Move this way.
Move this way.
Never getting frustrated.
Never making him wrong.
Never lecturing him.
Just…
LETTING HIM DISCOVER THE TECHNIQUE!
I don’t teach,
I back off and let the student fall forward.
When he finally catches himself…
He has educated himself,
And he has learned how to educate himself,
And educating himself is going to get that much easier.
And my job gets easier and easier and…easier.

Okay,
I should wind it up here,
I’ve blatted your ear long enough.
If you want to jump out of the trip
Where people tel you you are wrong,
Then come on over to the matrixing trip.
Guaranteed.
It I fun.

The Circle of Blocks is in the ‘Matrix Karate’ course.

1a Matrix Karate

But if you think you’re smart,
And want to cut to the chase,
Try the Master Instructor Course.

1d Master Instructor Course

Now…
HAVE A GREAT WORK OUT!
Al

1e Core Package

Small Steps to a Big Black Belt

Newsletter 935

Problems with Promoting People to Black Belt

Just to warn you,
there is a lot of meandering this newsletter,
so get your head ready
to turn left or right
on a whim or a blink.

I was talking with another instructor,
and he told me how he got black belt.
He spent five years at the belt below black belt.
He was in his mid thirties,
and he finally went up to the head instructor and said,
‘Promote me,
I’m not getting better,
I’m just getting older.’

Just getting older.
How grim.
Which brings us to the point of it all.

In the beginning,
a person was promoted when he finished
the requirements necessary to promotion.

Chuck Norris did it in a year and a half.
Mike Stone did it in 7 months.
Joe Lewis earned THREE black belts in a year.

Sure,
they are superstars,
but why can’t we finish our requirements and get promoted?

It was Kenpo that established the standard,
they introduced the famous ‘car contracts,’
which were contracts designed by an Arthur Murray dance instructor.
Kenpo spread out the material
so the contract would last four years,
keep the student paying tuition for four years.
Survival, man.
And within a couple of years
all systems of martial arts lasted four years.

Then we have people like my friend,
who are kept at a belt level,
brown or purple,
or whatever,
for five years plus,
until they finally confront their instructor
and demand to be promoted.

Or,
let me digress a moment,
I knew a fellow,
it was kenpo,
who set up a program for his students
to reach black belt in…17 years.

That’s right.
His students were signing up for
SEVENTEEN YEARS!
Zowie.
What’s funny is that,
at the time,
he had 12 years experience.
That’s right,
he had never completed his own system.
But he was demanding students do…what he hadn’t.
Can somebody spell ‘crazy’ for me?

Anyway,
back to the issue at hand,
when should a person be promoted?
When he shows competence at the level he is at.
If he is required to do a form,
a certain set of techniques,
he must show that he understands
the form and the techniques…
and can do them.

So how long does it take to become competent?
If your system is properly arranged,
3 – 6 months per belt.
If your system is matrixed
1 – 3 months per belt.

And some individuals can go faster.

The test is simple.
If you are doing a form…
do you understand what the moves mean?
Can you take a move and apply it?
Without thinking?
To anybody?

You don’t need Bruce Lee’s speed.
You don’t need to pluck arrows out of the air.
You just need to know what something means,
and show that you can do it.

It’s like a plumber.
He knows what length to cut the pipe,
how to connect the pipe.
And that’s it.
for one level.
No mysterious standards,
just simple level
after simple level.

I remember somebody telling me
to sail a boat they needed to take a course,
read a 500 page book,
take a test,
and hope they remembered enough to pass.

But I was told that there is a rudder,
and a sail.
Two moving parts…plus the wind.
500 pages and a test to learn how to point the rudder
away from your destination,
and fill the sail with wind.
Hmmm.

My ultimate instruction for karate is…
don’t get hit…hit the other person.
Sure,
it is sadly lacking,
but once the person fills his sails
you can tell him about currents.
And once the person is looking at a fist in his face,
you can tell him about blocking.
Really.

Now,
with all these sad understatements,
let’s talk about what you are really looking for.

You are looking for control.
Not whether a person can remember a pattern,
or a series of techniques,
but whether he can control his body.

Is he falling over…
I like to call this falling off the floor…
because his stance isn’t being used to sink his weight?

Is his butt wiggling because
he is putting power in his butt instead of his fist?

Is he out of breath because
he isn’t breathing properly?

Do his blocks collapse under impact?

These are the simple questions I ask,
and I ask them of ALL belts.
No hidden standards.

Sure,
a white belt is sloppy,
and a black belt is snappy,
and in-between there are gradient steps,
never too big for the student,
never so small.
Just a staircase of simple steps
leading to more and more body control.

I once observed that white belts and black belts,
in a class,
were doing the same things.
The black belt just looked better at it,
didn’t get out of breath,
and so on.

Nothing mysterious,
no hidden tricks.
Just…a slow climb to competence.

Now,
let me make some points.
These are the points I usually lose readers at,
they read this stuff,
disagree so loudly,
that they immediately cancel the newsletter.

There was a rumor,
once upon a time,
that a student had to fight,
AND DEFEAT
100 other black belts
to earn his black belt.

This was a rumor taken from Kyoshinkai,
where they have a 100 man kumite.
Nobody ever defeats all the 100 men,
in fact,
by the time they are in the last 50,
they are pretty badly bruised and beaten.
By the time they reach the last 10,
they are usually getting beaten pretty regularly.
But the question is…do they finish?
Or do they quit?
It is a matter of spirit.
Do they have it or not?

Interesting reality behind this rumor.

I have seen schools
where they do demand a brown belt
to defeat black belts before they are promoted.
But there is a severe wrongness to what they are doing.

To beat somebody doesn’t show any degree of competence,
it just means you can beat up people.
And beating up people is not the point of the martial arts,
learning how to be a competent human being is.

And,
when somebody is enrolled in a type of school,
where they are expected to ‘roll’ for four or five years
on a single belt level,
before getting a black belt,
that does not show competence.
It shows endurance,
and a variation on 100 man freestyle,
and…
proving that you can beat somebody up
to qualify for black belt.

But I just told you,
if you are learning how to beat people up
you are not learning martial arts.
Sure,
you can beat people up with the martial arts,
but the martial arts are really about…competence.
Achieving a skill level.
Not proving that you can ‘take it.’
Or endure.
Or beat people up.

And,
the people i lose?
They are the ones stuck in a belt level for half a dozen years,
they are stuck,
can’t take any perceived criticism,
need to beat those people up,
and quit the newsletter.

The people who need this advice the most
are the ones the most put off by it.

Ah,
well.

My advice is this:
select a system with standards,
even steps between the belts,
without dominating personalities
demanding you to beat people up.
Find a system where you can see
the small differences between belts.
Where you can see people taking small steps
to make the big leap to black belt.

And,
if you can’t find one,
better learn some matrixing.
Learn how to understand the martial arts,
it will be ten times easier to learn an art then.
Even an art that demands endurance instead of competence.

Here’s the first course on matrixing…

1a Matrix Karate

Have a great work out!

Al

Here’s a link for an article about when I first started doing this book on Kenjutsu.
I intended to finish it quickly, but it’s actually been five years!

New Book About the Samurai Sword is Coming

here is the page on the new book on Matrixing Kenjutsu

Matrixing Kenjutsu

 

How to Become Truly Creative in Your Martial Arts Training!

Newsletter 934

Outside the Martial Arts Box!

I used to ask my instructor
what he did to get better.
What did he work on?
What were his training methods?
He answered me:
‘I just do the forms.’
But he could stick his index finger
through a board and leave a hole.
Obviously,
there had to be something more.
It took me a while,
but I figured out the ‘extra ingredient.’
Going outside the box.

For instance,
I’ve written about his kicking bag.
We couldn’t go to a store and buy a bag back then,
we had to make our own.
I bought a duffle bag,
packed it with sawdust,
used it for a while.
It was a true piece of…stuff.
But it worked,
and I practiced,
and my kicks got better.
He did the same thing,
sort of.
He was able to find the canvas ‘sleeves.
He filled it with sawdust,
and the thing was too light,
didn’t pack right,
fell out of shape after a few hundred kicks.
So he experimented,
going ‘outside the box,’
and packed it with sawdust and water.
It got moldy.
He tried adding bleach.
Got soggy,
and he tried other methods.
His stroke of
outside the box
genius?
He cut newspapers in circles,
and stacked the circles in the bag.
Rock hard,
never fell out of shape,
light enough to hang without bending the rafters,
and so on.
This is true ‘out of the box’ thinking.
He did something totally unique,
nobody had EVER done anything like this,
and likely haven’t since then.
But his kicks were truly…
outside the box.

So,
let me describe the trap you are currently in,
which stops you from thinking outside the box.
I came across a fellow on the net,
and he was talking about if bags get too hard
you can’t kick them.
And he’s going into the physics,
and how it is physically impossible
according to the rules of the universe,
and so on.
If my instructor had ever paid attention to the physics…
he never would have made that bag.
He would have been trapped by,
not the physics,
but the belief system surrounding physics.

I was once told that a bumble bee can’t fly.
His weight is too much,
his wings too stubby,
according to physics,
the bumble bee can’t fly.
Thank god the bumble bee doesn’t know physics.
Thank god the bumblebee has his own belief system.

And we get all these athletes
training by physics,
eating the food,
using the training devices,
following regimens described by people
who know physics.

Before the four minute mile was cracked,
it was considered impossible.
No human could ever do that.
Now,
on the top tier of runners,
you’re sort of a wannabe
if you can’t break the four minute mile.
But the physics didn’t change.
What changed was people’s belief in physics.
Or,
they didn’t accept the physics,
and they went ahead and broke the rules.
Went outside the box.
Did something that nobody believed they could do,
just because,
in their supreme moment of ignorance,
they believed in themselves,
and ignored the idiots.
They went outside the box.

When my instructor kicked that bag,
it was too hard,
he should have broken his foot.
But,
he figured out how to kick the bag a little,
and his foot got stronger,
but more important,
his belief that he COULD kick that bag got stronger.
And,
as he kept kicking that bag,
his kicks slowly improved,
and his belief system,
his idea of what it was possible for him to do,
changed.

So that is how you go outside the box.
You get an idea,
you chip away at it,
you look at it,
and you expand your belief system
beyond the belief system
of those that are trapped by belief systems.

Now,
you don’t have a unique idea?
Yes,
you do.
When the instructor has you do ten kicks in class,
do eleven.
Go home and do a hundred.
I noticed that the fellows in my school
who had the best kicks,
were practicing 200 kicks per kick per side.
So I went home and started practicing
250 kicks per kick per side.
And,
man,
am I glad I did.
I’m 70 now,
and when I practice with these young kids,
my front kick is still faster,
and they really don’t like blocking it,
it hurts them to block it.

And,
what about forms?
Do you do your forms twice or thrice
and then call it?
How about doing your forms ten times?
Or,
have you ever done a form100 times in a row?
It changes you.
It changes the way you think about forms.
It changes your belief in forms.
Something I used to do,
I was practicing Tai Chi,
and I decided to pile stance it.
There are about 108 moves
in the classical form,
I took a full minute to do each move.
Took me two hours to do one form.
But,
Lord,
I was different after that.
My Tai Chi was different,
and I started to really understand
what the old Tai Chi masters were talking about.

Anyway,
I hope this gives you an idea on how to think outside the box.
The only advantage you’ve got is your imagination,
imagination IS thinking outside the box,
so put in a little extra sweat,
and put yourself outside the box.

And,
obligatory ad,
The book,
Chiang Nan,
is definitely outside the box.
I combined Karate and Tai Chi,
and got some interesting results,
results not covered by the fellows spouting their physics.
Here’s the link.

https://www.amazon.com/Chiang-Nan-Al-Case/dp/198767765X

Have a great work out!

Al

Here’s a link for an article about when I first started doing this book on Kenjutsu.
I intended to finish it quickly, but it’s actually been five years!

New Book About the Samurai Sword is Coming